Appraisal practice in the United States is regulated by state. The Appraisal Foundation (TAF) is the primary standards body; its Appraisal Standards Board (ASB) promulgates and updates best practices as codified in the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP), while its Appraisal Qualifications Board (AQB) promulgates minimum standards for appraiser certification and licensing.
Today, Orange County Property Appraiser Rick Singh, CFA, was awarded the 2018 Ian W. McClung International Award by the International Association of Assessing Officers (IAAO) for his exemplary leadership in developing valuation professionals around the world. Mr. Singh was chosen to receive this award for “Theme Park Valuation,” a presentation made in October 2017 at the IAAO International Symposium during which he shared the methods, techniques, and magnitude and importance ...More  
Just released numbers from VISIT FLORIDA indicate another banner year for tourism. Some 65.5 million visitors graced the Sunshine State in the first six months. That’s more than in any six month period in the state’s history, and a nearly 6% increase over last year. Certainly a strong start to the year, but what impact will the red tide on the west coast have? Or will a hurricane damage the momentum? Good news for sure, but we must continue to diversify Florida’s jobs and make sure that the state is not only a fun place to visit.  
The sales comparison approach is based primarily on the principle of substitution. This approach assumes a prudent (or rational) individual will pay no more for a property than it would cost to purchase a comparable substitute property. The approach recognizes that a typical buyer will compare asking prices and seek to purchase the property that meets his or her wants and needs for the lowest cost. In developing the sales comparison approach, the appraiser attempts to interpret and measure the actions of parties involved in the marketplace, including buyers, sellers, and investors.
To qualify, the homestead property must have been uninhabitable for at least 30 days and affected owners must file a sworn application for Abatement of Taxes for Homestead Residential Improvements (DR-463) along with supporting documentation to the Property Appraiser.  If approved, the Property Appraiser will issue an official written statement to the Tax Collector, who will calculate and issue the credit. 
In accordance with Section 193.122, Florida Statutes, Public Notice is hereby given that the Property Appraiser has recertified the 2017 Real and Tangible Personal Property Assessment Rolls at the close of business day on June 26, 2018. This recertification reflects all changes made by the Value Adjustment Board prior to May 23, 2018, together with any adjustments or changes made by the Property Appraiser.

Our experience in the personal property field is second to none. Each appraisal assignment we perform is held to the highest level of scrutiny. We pride ourselves on our honesty, integrity and commitment to service. All of our appraisals are prepared with the knowledge that we are ready and able to stand up in court, if necessary, to justify our findings.
There can be differences between what the property is really worth (market value) and what it cost to buy it (price). A price paid might not represent that property's market value. Sometimes, special considerations may have been present, such as a special relationship between the buyer and the seller where one party had control or significant influence over the other party. In other cases, the transaction may have been just one of several properties sold or traded between two parties. In such cases, the price paid for any particular piece is not its market "value" (with the idea usually being, though, that all the pieces and prices add up to the market value of all the parts) but rather its market "price".
Historically, most valuations in Israel were statutory valuations (such as valuations performed for purposes of Betterment Tax, a tax administered on any gains accruing to the property by way of changes to the local planning) as well as valuations performed for purposes of bank lending. Since Israel implemented the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) in 2008, the profession has been engaged in performing valuations for purposes of financial reporting.

Real estate valuation in New Zealand is regulated by the New Zealand Institute of Valuers ('NZIV') and the Valuers Registration Board of New Zealand ('VRB'), both of which are statutory bodies established under the Valuers Act 1948 (NZ). The NZIV remains the statutory professional body for valuers in New Zealand, with perpetual succession under the Act (which is under review as at 2015). The NZIV can make Rules as lower level legislation and has a Code of Ethics. The NZIV Rules were last changed in 2012 and remain current. The VRB has jurisdiction in relation to serious matters affecting the registration of a valuer including discipline where a valuer has acted in such a way as to meet the threshold. The Valuers Act 1948 sets the threshold under s31 as matters where a valuer could be struck off the register of valuers. The NZIV has power for discipline for relatively more minor matters. The NZIV governs NZIV members and has power to discipline members and fine them up to $500, admonish members or terminate their membership. The designations "Registered Valuer" and "Public Valuer" are legally protected under the legislation, being reserved for Valuers Registered under the Act. The NZIV, under the Act, can admit non-valuer members (such as non-valuer land economists).
Twitty, 49, brings a wealth of knowledge to the position. A lifelong Pinellas County resident and University of Florida graduate, he went to work for Entreken Associates, a small local appraisal firm, and eventually bought an ownership stake. Entreken later merged with other firms to form Valbridge Property Advisors, a national company handling residential and commercial appraisals and eminent domain cases. Twitty has appraised thousands of properties of varying types and holds the field's highest professional designation. As a director with Valbridge, he has extensive management experience that will be key to running a professional office that serves the public. He has a vision for modernizing the office, including creating a user-friendly, one-stop-shopping website that can generate reports on individual properties and includes zoning and land use information, tax records and other public records.

Incumbent Property Appraiser Pam Dubov is retiring after eight years in office. Elected in the wake of a scandal, she has provided steady leadership and sound service to the public. The office faces new challenges with her departure, including more impending retirements of senior staffers with institutional memory. The office also needs to upgrade both the software it uses to appraise Pinellas properties and the website that serves as the public portal.
Unlike appraisers, assessors have no federal requirement for certification. In states that mandate certification for assessors, the requirements are usually similar to those for appraisers. For example, the International Association of Assessing Officers (IAAO) offers the Certified Assessment Evaluator (CAE). This designation covers topics that include property valuation for tax purposes, property tax administration, and property tax policy. Applicants are required to have a bachelor's degree prior to obtaining the designation.
Because of a terrible quirk in state law, the next Pinellas County property appraiser will be chosen only by Republicans in the Aug. 30 primary. The two candidates are Mike Twitty, a veteran appraiser in the private sector, and Jim Frishe, a former state legislator. There is no Democratic candidate, but the presence of a write-in candidate in November means only Republicans get to vote in a primary that should be open to all voters. Twitty is the clear choice.

The Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery, and Enforcement Act of 1989 (FIRREA) demanded all the states to develop systems for licensing and certifying real estate appraisers.[26] To accomplish this, the Appraisal Subcommittee (ASC) was formed within the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council (FFIEC), with representatives from the various Federal mortgage regulatory agencies.[27] Thus, currently all the real estate appraisers must be state-licensed and certified. But prior to the 1990s, there were no commonly accepted standards either for appraisal quality or for appraiser licensure. In the 1980s, an ad-hoc committee representing various appraisal professional organizations in the United States and Canada met to codify the best practices into what became known as the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP). The U.S. Savings and Loan Crisis resulted in increased federal regulation via the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery and Enforcement Act of 1989, which required federal lending regulators to adopt appraisal standards. A nonprofit organization, The Appraisal Foundation (TAF), was formed by the same organizations that had developed USPAP, and the copyright for USPAP was signed over to TAF. Federal oversight of TAF is provided by the Appraisal Subcommittee, made up of representatives of various federal lending regulators. TAF carries out its work through two boards: the Appraisal Standards Board promulgates and updates USPAP; the Appraisal Qualifications Board (AQB) promulgates minimum recommended standards for appraiser certification and licensure. During the 1990s, all of the states adopted USPAP as the governing standards within their states and developed licensure standards which met or exceeded the recommendations of TAF. Also, the various state and federal courts have adopted USPAP for real estate litigation and all of the federally lending regulators adopt USPAP for mortgage finance appraisal.[27]
The Florida Constitution and Florida Statutes §119 and §286 safeguard every Floridian’s right of access to government meetings and public records. In Florida, disclosure is the standard, unless the Legislature allows an exemption or the records are otherwise confidential. Every citizen has the right to obtain public records that are not exempted or confidential. Citizens and the media can easily request public records from Pinellas County government. The requester is responsible for any cost of providing the documentation, which includes staff time, cost of copies and other costs that are associated with the request.
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