Data is collected on recent sales of properties similar to the subject being valued, called "comparables". Only SOLD properties may be used in an appraisal and determination of a property's value, as they represent amounts actually paid or agreed upon for properties. Sources of comparable data include real estate publications, public records, buyers, sellers, real estate brokers and/or agents, appraisers, and so on. Important details of each comparable sale are described in the appraisal report. Since comparable sales are not identical to the subject property, adjustments may be made for date of sale, location, style, amenities, square footage, site size, etc. The main idea is to simulate the price that would have been paid if each comparable sale were identical to the subject property. If the comparable is superior to the subject in a factor or aspect, then a downward adjustment is needed for that factor.[clarification needed] Likewise, if the comparable is inferior to the subject in an aspect, then an upward adjustment for that aspect is needed.[clarification needed] The adjustment is somewhat subjective and relies on the appraiser's training and experience. From the analysis of the group of adjusted sales prices of the comparable sales, the appraiser selects an indicator of value that is representative of the subject property. It is possible for various appraisers to choose a different indicator of value which ultimately will provide different property value.

This week, at the IAAO International meeting, valued members of the OCPA team made presentations to their colleagues. Roger Ross gave a wildly popular presentation on the Agency’s commitment to customer service. Terry Taylor and Jeff Miller also presented an educational session on “Agriculture in the Land of Amusement,” sharing information of the diversity of properties within Orange County.  


Just released numbers from VISIT FLORIDA indicate another banner year for tourism. Some 65.5 million visitors graced the Sunshine State in the first six months. That’s more than in any six month period in the state’s history, and a nearly 6% increase over last year. Certainly a strong start to the year, but what impact will the red tide on the west coast have? Or will a hurricane damage the momentum? Good news for sure, but we must continue to diversify Florida’s jobs and make sure that the state is not only a fun place to visit.  

A physical appraisal is necessary to evaluate a property. Depending on the size of the property, this can take anywhere from 15 minutes to three hours or more. After this step is complete, the appraiser will need to compare the results against recent area sales of similar properties to draw some conclusions regarding value. A report is provided once the appraisal is completed, and this is typically sent to the client within a week of the property inspection.


These appraisers also perform valuations on commercial property ranging from single to multiple tenant office buildings, shopping centers, retail, industrial, malls, hospitals, health care facilities, warehouses, and hotels to multi-family apartment buildings, co-ops, senior housing, condominium developments, and even vacant land, agricultural, and golf courses.  Regardless of the property type or local zoning, they'll determine the highest and best use of the project and assess the value using the actual or projected cash flow from the property's rent roll and financial statements, using both cap rates for capitalizing year one net operating income (NOI) and discounted cash flow (DCF) of multiple future income streams.  If you're a commercial lender, investor, builder, contractor, architect, or agent, you'll want to use these appraisers to conduct a feasibility analysis of any income producing real estate project you may be considering.  They can also help consult on construction costs and projected absorption rates.  They generally produce a commercial narrative appraisal when engaged for any commercial assignment.
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